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20121205
20121213
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on the fiscal cliff. john is next, from new york, receiving unemployment benefits. caller: my biggest concern right now with the unemployment thing is that i do not have a ged so my biggest problem is attending school in programs while i am trying to get back to work, and nobody in this economy will touch somebody without a high-school diploma. it is hard, because i have worked my whole life and i have three kids to raise. it is hard, because i have to go back to work. something needs to change. i'm a hard-working some of the gun and everyone in my family knows it. i hear everyone talking about how this economy is bad. i'm doing side jobs just to put food on the table. the next as government assistance, and we should not have to be there. host: how will the fiscal cliff negotiations affect you? will you lose benefits? caller: i will lose benefits at the end of december, and i will have to go on county assistance to see what they can do to help, but i would rather go back to work. i started picking work when i was 12 years old. host: what are you doing to prepare for the scenario? caller: i am
saying " called fiscal cliff." david john m. have alluded to my question earlier when i was on line. he mentioned something about multimillionaire's not receiving social security. there is a whole group of us out there. i was raised by depression parents who save, save, saved. they always said they did not need social security. i have a decent teacher pension but when social security kicked in, it was nice to have extra money. on their statistics available on a group of us who have saved and our parents have saved and we do not need social security? guest: i would like to congratulate you and having done what a lot of folks are unable to do and that is saved for your retirement. we encourage all of our members to do more to build up their nest egg. we know that most people are not in your situation. 1/3 opal social security recipients rely entirely on that income for their retirement. there are some folks like you. they do rely on this program to get by in their retirement years. guest: this is something we need to address going forward. the fact is that we are in an era of scarcity. we
on the fiscal cliff. here's the wall street journal -- but then here's the "washington times this morning with their deadline -- headline -- so those are two headlines on house speaker john boehner and how he is doing in the fiscal cliff tops. headline is the president and the speaker both press each other. so that the latest in the back and forth on the fiscal cliff talks. the polls out, this is one from gallup. and the new york post shows this poll -- back to our topic, our question, do you support or oppose right-to-work laws? paul in utica, michigan, democrat. caller: i live in suburban detroit. i am a retired union worker, not automotive, by the way. i don't think my union is a thug in any way, but i think it's a sad day for the state of michigan. if the workers in this country cannot look to michigan like they always have, for a decent pay, and i think that is where we are headed, i just think it is a sad day. all the people who voted for these republicans, they are going to get what they asked for. this is what is going on here. i really sad about it. host: the car czar for michiga
obama and john boehner met yesterday afternoon at the white house to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. their first meeting in 23 days. both sides are not saying what if any progress were made. washington has 22 days left to me -- make a deal. "the post" had lined, "a deal is a vital." what are you willing to sacrifice to avert the so-called this clip? for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. remember, also, send us it twitter message, the analysis is that americans need to embrace sacrifice again. he says that any outcome of this is going to require sacrifice and pain from the american public. in the peace he writes that the problem is not washington, that it is us. no longer are we willing to pay for the things that we know that we need. boaters that demand something for nothing will demand otherwise. politicians who fear for their jobs will comply. we want to turn to all of you and ask you, what are you willing to sacrifice? are you willing to change medicare and social security as republicans say is needed? are you willing to incre
of fresh talks to avoid these so-called fiscal cliff. these are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. "washington journal" continues. host: phone numbers are up on the screen. we're going to go through the papers. no congress today. they're up for the weekend. they're scheduled adjournment date is december 14. everyone has an opinion and a fun little betting game, when will they adjourn, what will they do before they adjourn, what is going to happen? i'm going to go through a couple of papers before we get to your calls. this is the lead story in the "l.a. times" class morning. port strike part of a bigger fight. the eight-day strike that crippled one of the world's busiest ports reflected a clash that is playing out across the global shipping industry as ports and their unionized work forces gird for an era of briskly expanding foreign trade. the strike that shut down the ports of los angeles and long beach paralleled the generational skirmishes that have ripped through factory shops. cargo companies and ports want to cut costs and automate operations to compete with aggr
caller. caller: how are you? it seems like it is open phones. i think as far as the fiscal cliff is concerned, the democrats and republicans need to come together and they need to do that rather quickly, because that's the way i feel about it. host: do you think it decides it should just agree to pass the tax cuts -- extend the tax cuts for middle-class americans and then wait until later to resume the debate over spending and tax cuts for wealthy americans? caller: they should start with that. and if they agree on that, then they can go on to the next thing. but this lagging and dragging along on both sides makes no sense. host: here is the washington post this morning. [video clip] >> i don't think the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that is relevant is the acknowledgment that if we are going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with very tough cuts we have already made and further reforms and entitlements i'm prepared to make, that we are going to have to see the rates on the top to% go up. we are not calling to able to get a d
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6